Oral Communication Rubrics

  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/modules/node/node.module on line 765.
  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/modules/node/node.module on line 765.
  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/modules/node/node.module on line 765.
  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/modules/node/node.module on line 765.
  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/modules/node/node.module on line 765.
  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/modules/node/node.module on line 765.
  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/modules/node/node.module on line 765.
  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/modules/node/node.module on line 765.
  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/modules/node/node.module on line 765.
  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/modules/node/node.module on line 765.
  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/modules/node/node.module on line 765.
  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/modules/node/node.module on line 765.
  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/modules/node/node.module on line 765.
  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/modules/node/node.module on line 765.
  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/modules/node/node.module on line 765.
  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/modules/node/node.module on line 765.
  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/modules/node/node.module on line 765.
  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/modules/node/node.module on line 765.
  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/isucomm/modules/node/node.module on line 765.

Speech Evaluation Criteria

Criteria for Evaluating Informative and Persuasive Speeches

For more information on this Modified Point System Grading, read a summary of pros and cons of this method.

The following rubric for assessing speeches is based on a 100-point scale. To translate to letter grades for subsections, use the following table as a guide.

10 points
9 = A
8 = B
7 = C
6 = D

15 points
13.5 = A
12 = B
10.5 = C
9 = D

20 points
18 = A
16 = B
14 = C
12 = D

30 points
27 = A
24 = B
21 = C
19 = D

 

For all sections:
(F) = item is not evident in outline or presentation
(D) = an attempt has been made to include item in either outline or presentation

Outline and References (10 Points Possible)

Purpose Statement Clear

(C) = Purpose has been expressed as a statement, using a full phrase, and presents one distinct idea.
(B) = In addition, it has been stated such that it is relevant and adapted to the appropriate audience
(A) = In addition, linguistic devices have been used in presentation of purpose

Follows Outline Format

(C) = Has a clear separation of points, points are written in full sentences, has a consistent pattern of indentation, includes written transitions, previews, summaries, and has few writing errors
(B) = In addition, it includes phrases that connect the parts of the speech so they flow together, the connections between ideas are logical and evidence directly supports the ideas
(A) = In addition, it is thorough, creative and employs a unique treatment of the topic

References Correct/Sufficient

(C) = A minimum of four sources in APA format on the reference page, with few mistakes
(B) = In addition, sources cited are from credible and qualified sources
(A) = In addition, sources provide insightful perspective to the issue(s)

Introduction (20 Points Possible)

Gained Attention

(C) = Began with an attention getting device that prepared the audience to listen to a speech on the topic
(B) = In addition, it created a need to listen to the rest of the speech and flowed well into the relevance statement
(A) = In addition, it is creative, original, and highly motivating

Showed Relevance of Topic to Audience

(C) = The importance of the topic is established
(B) = In addition, the importance of the topic is related to the audience and well integrated
(A) = In addition, it is of significant importance to the audience

Established Credibility

(C) = Student clearly states why he or she is competent to speak on the topic
(B) = In addition, the statement is well integrated into the introduction and presents a logical argument for speaker credibility
(A) = In addition, statement is a unique and creative way of presenting a personal connection to the topic

Introduced Topic/Thesis Statement Clearly

(C) = Statement is direct and leaves little or no room for confusion about topic
(B) = In addition, statement flows very well into the preview
(A) = In addition, it has been worded powerfully and in a way that demonstrates a unique approach to the topic

Previewed Body of Speech

(C) = Preview fits well with the topic/thesis statement and clearly (and briefly) states exactly what each main point will be about
(B) = In addition, preview logically follows from the thesis/topic statement and flows well into the opening transition
(A) = In addition, it uses powerful and creative language tailored to the topic

Body (30 Points Possible)

Main Points Clear

(C) = Main points are easy to identify
(B) = In addition, main points are well integrated and each is an independent idea
(A) = In addition, main points are made exceptionally clear with the use of internal transitions and previews, as well as signposting

Strong Evidence and Supporting Material

(C)= A minimum of four sources have been used for evidence and sources have been orally identified
(B) = In addition, the supporting material furthers the argument and a link between the evidence and the claims has been provided
(A) = In addition, creative language has been used to introduce evidence

Organization Effective

(C) = The quantity and arrangement of the issues is appropriate to the topic
(B) = In addition, the issues are organized to meet the specific purpose of the speech
(A) = In addition, sentences are carefully constructed, have parallel structure, and include repetition of language

Language Precise, Clear, Powerful

(C) = Language has been used accurately, clearly, and appropriately with heavy use of concrete and familiar words.
(B) = In addition, clutter (superfluous words) is absent from the presentation, demonstrating an economy of language use
(A) = In addition, language is used vividly, employing imagery, clear metaphors, and a smooth rhythm.

Transitions Effective

(C) = Transitions are used to connect main points
(B) = In addition, transitions use full sentences and briefly state what was just talked about and what will now be talked about
(A) = In addition, transitions are references to other devices (preview, attention getter, etc.), and make use of metaphor.

Sources Are Well Integrated, Credible, and Cited Fully

(C) = The author (source, if author unavailable) and date of information have been provided
(B) = In addition, the source references are placed just before the information being cited, and are relevant to the topic
(A) = In addition, sources are from a reputable source, are fully cited, and include evidence of source credibility

Conclusion (10 Points Possible)

Audience Prepared for Conclusion

(C) = Speaker has made a statement that suggests he/she is moving into the conclusion
(B) = In addition, the statement flows well from the body and into the review
(A) = In addition, speaker has used language to make the statement creative and unique

Purpose and Main Points Reviewed

(C) = The main points have been briefly noted and no new information has been presented
(B) = In addition, links have been provided that bridge the gas between transition and review, and the review to the closing statement
(A) = In addition, it is not just a restatement of the opening preview

Closed Speech by Reference to Introduction/Other Devices

(C) = One final sentence is provided after review that closes speech
(B) = In addition, a link has been provided between reference to attention getter and/or closing thought
(A) = In addition, closing thought is a quotation (or other device) related to the topic that signals the end of the speech

Delivery (15 Points Possible)

Maintained Eye Contact

(C) = Speaker maintained eye contact with audience for at least half the time of the speech
(B) = In addition, eye contact was purposeful, pleasant, comfortable and established with most of the audience
(A) = In addition, eye contact was maintained for almost the whole speech

Uses Voice, Diction and Rate for Maximum Effect

(C) = Majority of words have been pronounced and articulated properly
(B) = In addition, vocal variety has been employed to highlight key information
(A) = In addition, voice, diction and rate demonstrate the speaker’s enthusiasm and interest in the topic

Used Space, Movement, and Gestures for Emphasis

(C) = Delivery had few distracting gestures, movements, or body shifting
(B) = In addition, space and movement was used to transition between points, and gestures to add emphasis
(A) = In addition, use of space, movement and gestures clearly demonstrated the speaker’s enthusiasm for the topic

Overall Impression (15 Points Possible)

Challenging Topic

(C) = Topic is consistent with assignment
(B) = In addition, the speech provides audience with new and relevant insight into the topic
(A)= In addition, the speech made a genuine contribution to the thinking of the audience about the topic

Adapted to Audience

(C) = An attempt was made to adapt topic to audience
(B) = In addition, several references to audience were integrated throughout presentation
(A) = In addition, a high degree of rapport was established through exceptional adaptation of topic to the specific audience

Evidence of Preparation and Practice

(C) = Speech must have been delivered extemporaneously, notes conformed to instructor requirements
(B) = In addition, speaker did not rely heavily on note cards and was clearly ready to present the speech
(A) = In addition, speaker displayed poise and confidence indicative of a well-practiced speech

Maintained Time Limits

(C) = The speech was delivered within the time limits
(B) = In addition, an appropriate balance of time was spent on each idea
(A) = In addition, the speech was fully developed within the time limits

Quality and Relevance of Visual Aids

(C) = Correct numbers of visuals were used
(B) = In addition, visuals could be seen clearly and were devoid of distractions, clutter, and a link was presented to connect visual to issue being discussed
(A) = In addition, the visuals were used to help audience understand difficult material

Was Informative

(C) = Speech was of the type assigned
(B) = In addition, information was easy to understand
(A) = In addition, speech added interesting and new information to the audience’s body of knowledge

Developed by Cheri Simonds and Stephen Hunt, Illinois State University

DOC  PDF

Holistic Grading Overview for Oral Presentations

Holistic Criteria Used for Evaluating Speeches

For more information on this Holistic Grading Approach, read a summary of pros and cons of this method.

The Informative Speech Feedback Form offers an example of the following holistic grading approach.

The following lists give the general criteria by which the student will be evaluated for each assignment. The grades earned are based on individual performance according to these criteria as well as the student's ability to meet the specific requirements of the assignment.

A failing (F) speech is seriously deficient and is characterized by one or more of the following:

  1. It is not delivered on the day assigned and the speaker has not contacted his/her instructor prior to class.
  2. It has serious ethical flaws such as plagiarizing another person’s speech, using sources without proper citation, or manufacturing support material and citations.
  3. It does not correspond to the definition of the assignment (e.g., it is persuasive when the assignment calls for an informative speech).
  4. It does not come close to conforming to the time limit.
  5. It insults, humiliates, or demeans the audience or members of the community at large or is in other ways inappropriate for a presentation in a university classroom.

A below average (D) speech is significantly deficient and characterized by one or more of the following:

  1. It fails to clearly conform to any of the patterns of organization.
  2. It is delivered in a way that ignores the audience (e.g., it is read to the audience).
  3. It is delivered late with prior approval of your instructor.
  4. It fails to conform to the time limit.
  5. It fails to use or cite support materials as required by the assignment.

An average (C) speech is an adequate speech. It is usually organized and clear, but it may lack audience impact or interest, strong support material, sustained eye contact, and effective non-verbal delivery. It should match the following description:

  1. It conforms to the kind of speech assigned.
  2. It is ready for presentation on the assigned date.
  3. It meets the time limit.
  4. It fulfills any special requirements of the assignment – such as preparing an outline, using a visual aid, or citing the appropriate number and type of sources.
  5. It has a clear specific purpose and central idea.
  6. It has an identifiable introduction, body, and conclusion.
  7. It follows one of the patterns of organization reasonably well.
  8. It shows reasonable directness and competence in delivery.
  9. It is free of repeated errors in grammar, pronunciation, and word usage.

An above average (B) speech is a good speech. It has significant content, good organization, and proficient delivery. It should meet all the criteria for the average speech and also match the following description:

  1. It fulfills all major functions of a speech introduction and conclusion.
  2. It displays clear organization of main points and support materials.
  3. Its main points are supported with evidence that meets the tests of accuracy, relevance, objectivity, and sufficiency.
  4. It exhibits proficient use of connectives.
  5. It is delivered skillfully enough so as not to distract attention from the speaker’s message.
  6. It demonstrates skill in winning agreement from auditors initially inclined toward apathy or disagreement or in winning actions from auditors.

A superior (A) speech stands out from the crowd. It has superior content, excellent organization, and distinctive delivery. In short, it represents the speaker’s best creative effort. An A speech gets nearly everyone in the audience thinking, excited, concerned, desirous to hear more, read more, or do something about what was said. It should meet all the criteria for the average and above average speeches and also match the following description:

  1. It constitutes a genuinely individual contribution by the speaker to the knowledge or beliefs of the audience.
  2. It meets the assignment exactly.
  3. It contains elements of vividness and special interest in the use of language.
  4. It is delivered in a fluent, polished manner that strengthens the impact of the speaker’s message.
  5. It illustrates mastery of the use of connectives.
  6. It exhibits creative thinking about and logical analysis of the topic.

Sources

  • Atkins, Martha. “Fundamentals of Speech Communication,” Iowa State University, 1993.
  • Dwyer, Karen. Public Speaking Workbook. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1996.
  • Lucas, Stephen. Instructor’s Manual to Accompany the Art of Public Speaking. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1995.
  • Oliver, Robert. “The Eternal (and Infernal) Problem of Grades.” The Speech Teacher, IX (1960): 8–11.

Submitted by Amy R. Slagell, Director of the Fundamentals of Public Speaking Program, Iowa State University

Downloadable Versions of This Document: DOC  PDF

Informative Speech Feedback Form

Informative Speech Feedback Form—Holistic Grading

For more information on this Holistic Grading Approach visit a holistic grading overview or
a summary of pros and cons of this method.

Speaker _____________________________________
Topic     _____________________________________

Guide: O-Outstanding  S-Satisfactory  N-Needs Work

Introduction
Attention and interest
Revealed topic
Established credibility
Previewed the body
Related to the audience
Strong delivery of the intro


O  S  N
O  S  N
O  S  N
O  S  N
O  S  N
O  S  N

Comments

 

Body
Main points clear
Pattern of organization helpful
Support materials adequate
Content accurate and interesting
Language use strong
Connectives effective
Visual aid content strong


O  S  N
O  S  N
O  S  N
O  S  N
O  S  N
O  S  N
O  S  N

 

Conclusion
Prepared audience for ending
Reinforced the central idea


O  S  N
O  S  N

 

Delivery
Maintained eye contact
Used voice effectively
Gestures effective
Stance strong
Visual aid presentation strong


O  S  N
O  S  N
O  S  N
O  S  N
O  S  N

 

Overall Evaluation
Topic challenging
Speech adapted to the audience
Speech fit the assignment


O  S  N
O  S  N
O  S  N

 

Suggestions for next time:

 

Submitted by Amy R. Slagell, Director of the Fundamentals of Public Speaking Program, Iowa State University

Downloadable Versions of This Document: DOC  PDF

Oral Presentation Rubric and Evaluation Sheet


Oral Presentation Rubric

Oral Communication: Expressing ideas clearly when communicating orally.
Use the Evaluation Sheet following this rubric as a guide for grading the oral presentation.

Criteria

Exemplary

Proficient

Marginal

Unacceptable

 

Organization

Presentation is
clear, logical and organized. Listener can follow line of reasoning.

Presentation is generally clear and well organized. A few minor points may be confusing.

Listener can follow presentation with effort. Some arguments are not clear. Organization seems haphazard.

Logic of arguments
is not made clear. Listeners are confused.

 

 
 
Style

 
Level of presentation is appropriate for the audience. Presentation is a planned conversation, paced for audience understanding. It is NOT a reading of a paper. Speaker is clearly comfortable in front of the group and can be heard by all.

 
Level of presentation is generally appropriate. Pacing is sometimes too fast or slow. The presenter seems
slightly uncomfortable at times, and the audience occasionally has trouble hearing the presenter.

 
Aspects of presentation are too elementary or too sophisticated for audience. Presenter seems uncomfortable and can be heard only if listener is very attentive. Much of the information is read.

 
Presentation consistently is too elementary or too sophisticated for the audience. Information is read to audience. Presenter is obviously anxious and cannot be heard.

 

 
Use of Communication Aids
(transparencies, slides, posters, handouts, etc.)

 
Communication aids enhance the presentation. They are prepared in a professional manner. Font on visuals is large enough to be seen by all. Information is organized to maximize audience understanding. Details are minimized so main points stand out.

 
Communication aids contribute to the quality of the presentation. Font size is appropriate for reading. Appropriate information is included. Some material is not supported by visual aids.

 
Communication aids are poorly prepared or used inappropriately. Font is too small to be easily seen. Too much information is included. Unimportant material is highlighted. Listeners may be confused.

 
No communication aids are used, or they are so poorly prepared that they detract from the presentation.

 

 
Content Depth

 
Speaker provides an accurate and complete explanation of key concepts and theories, drawing upon relevant literature. Listeners gain insights.

 
For the most part, explanations of concepts and theories are accurate and complete. Some helpful applications are included.

 
Explanations of concepts and/or theories are inaccurate or incomplete. Little attempt is made to tie theory to practice. Listeners gain little from the presentation.

 
No reference is made to literature of theory. Listeners gain no new insights.

 

 
Content Accuracy

 
Information (names, facts, etc.) included in the presentation is consistently accurate.

 
No significant errors are made. Listeners recognize any error to be the result of nervousness or oversight.

 
Enough errors are made to distract a knowledgeable listener, but some information is accurate. The presentation is useful if the listener can determine what information is reliable.

 
Information included is sufficiently inaccurate that the listener cannot depend on the presentation as a source of accurate information. Listeners may have been misled.

 

 
Use of Language: Grammar and Word Choice

 
Sentences are complete and grammatical, and they flow together easily. Words are chosen for their precise meaning.

 
For the most part, sentences are complete and grammatical, and they flow together easily. With a few exceptions, words are chosen for their precise meaning.

 
Listeners can follow the presentation, but some grammatical errors and use of slang are evident. Some sentences are incomplete/halting, and/or vocabulary is somewhat limited or inappropriate.

 
Listeners are so distracted by the presenter's apparent difficulty with the grammar and appropriate vocabulary that they cannot focus on the ideas presented.

 

 
Use of Language: Freedom from Bias
(sexism, racism, agism, heterosexism, etc.)

 
Both oral language and body language are free from bias.

 
Oral language and body language are free from bias with one or two exceptions.

 
Oral language and/or body language includes some significant bias. Listeners may be offended.

 
oral language and/or body language frequently reflects bias. Some, if not all, listeners will probably be offended.

 

 


Oral Presentation Evaluation Sheet

 
Use the above Oral Presentation Rubric to complete the following review sheet.

Name____________________________________________

 

Organization 
Comments:

Exemplary

Proficient

Marginal

Unacceptable

 

Style 
Comments:

Exemplary

Proficient

Marginal

Unacceptable

 

Use of Communication Aids 
Comments:

Exemplary

Proficient

Marginal

Unacceptable

 

Content Depth 
Comments:

Exemplary

Proficient

Marginal

Unacceptable

 

Content Accuracy 
Comments:

Exemplary

Proficient

Marginal

Unacceptable

 

Grammar and Word Choice 
Comments:

Exemplary

Proficient

Marginal

Unacceptable

 

Freedom from Bias 
Comments:

Exemplary

Proficient

Marginal

Unacceptable

 


Additional Comments:
 
 
 
 
 
 
Signature of Reviewer:___________________________________________

Date:________________________________

From the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies (8/24/2000)

DOC  PDF

Oral Presentation Evaluation - Peer Critique

Example Questions for Peer Critique Form

For more information on this Peer Critique Evaluation, read a summary of pros and cons of this method.

Speaker’s Name: _____________________________________________

Listener’s Name: _____________________________________________

1. List the Main Points for the speech as you listen.

2. What was the pattern of organization?

3. Write down a connective you heard the speaker use during the presentation.

4. How did the speaker get your attention in the introduction? How did they maintain attention during the speech?

5. What sources did you hear the speaker use today?

6. What is something you learned from the speech?

7. How did the speaker’s delivery help you stay engaged and learn something new?

8. How did the speaker’s delivery interfere with or make it harder to stay engaged or to learn something new?

Submitted by Amy R. Slagell, Director of the Fundamentals of Public Speaking Program, Iowa State University

Downloadable Versions of This Document: DOC  PDF

Peer Evaluation Sheet for Oral Presentations

Suggestion for Oral Presentation Peer Evaluation sheet

For more information on this Peer Critique Evaluation, read a summary of pros and cons of this method.

Presenters:____________________________________________

Content

____Began with a clear purpose
____Showed command of the material
____Supported assertions with evidence
____Used adequate and appropriate visuals
____Used material suited to this audience’s needs, knowledge, concerns, and interests
____Gave a sufficient amount of information

Organization

____Presented a clear line of reasoning
____Used transitions effectively
____Avoided needless digressions
____Summarized before concluding

Style

____Seemed confident, relaxed, and likeable
____Seemed in control of the speaking situation
____Showed appropriate enthusiasm
____Pronounced, enunciated, and spoke well
____Used appropriate hand gestures, tone, volume, and delivery rate
____Had good posture and eye contact
____Answered questions concisely and convincingly

Comments:

Overall professionalism: Superior________ Acceptable________ Needs work_______

Reviewer: __________________________________________________________

Submitted by Amy R. Slagell, Director of the Fundamentals of Public Speaking Program, Iowa State University

Downloadable Versions of This Document: DOC  PDF